cites update

cites update

CITES is the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora drawn up in 1973. This is the multilateral treaty that governs the trade of endangered species across borders and within countries. The treaty was imposed…

 

Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesu

Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesu

Newsletter No 3, December 2014

Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesu died 270 years ago, leaving a legacy as Cremona’s most maverick maker. We examine violins that have been inspired by his genius, with a variety of modern instruments and a closer look at the first English copyist of his work, George Craske.

 

George Craske

A fine violin by George Craske, Snow's Hill, circa 1835 after Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesu

After Craske’s legendary meeting with Paganini in 1832, he moved towards making Guarneri inspired violins, of which this is an early example. The instrument is made to his standard enlarged form, with characteristic flat arching and stylised del Gesu soundholes. The violin is unusual for having a scroll made by Craske, who later abandoned head carving in favour of buying in ready-made parts. A very fine and characteristic example with a strong and powerful tone.

 

George Craske

A fine violin by George Craske, Bath, circa 1820 after Stradivari

This is a rare example of George Craske’s work, from his early period in Bath, made around 1820 or slightly before. The model is very close to the Stradivari violin of his patron Sir Patrick Blake (bequeathed to him in 1815 by J.P. Salomon, and sold following Blake’s death in 1819). The narrow pattern is Stradiari’s shorter long pattern, exemplified by violins such as the ‘Baron Knoop’ of 1698.